Abraham Center Courses

Undergraduate Courses

AC4310 Introduction to Islam (Fall) (3 undergraduate credits)

This course introduces students to basic elements of Islamic societies in their diverse expressions, including origins, historical developments, beliefs, practices, worldviews, and cultural and religious patterns. Particular emphasis is given to understanding common barriers to communication and approaches for bridging worldview, cultural, and religious differences for purposes of transformation.

AC4310-SL Introduction to Islam (Fall) (3 undergraduate credits)

This course introduces students to basic elements of Islamic societies in their diverse expressions, including origins, historical developments, beliefs, practices, worldviews, and cultural and religious patterns. Particular emphasis is given to understanding common barriers to communication and approaches for bridging worldview, cultural, and religious differences for purposes of transformation.

AC4311-OL Communication and Service in Muslim Contexts (Online) (Spring) (3 undergraduate credits)

In light of scriptural and anthropological principles, this course explores the nature, dynamics, scope, challenges, and approaches in appropriate and effective service in Muslim contexts.

AC4315 Old Testament Survey (Fall) (3 undergraduate credits)

As an introductory survey of the history, literature, and message of the Old Testament, this course explores the unfolding of over-arching themes, narrative storyline, and intertextual relationships as understood by the history and historiography of the Hebrew scriptures. How Jewish, Christian, historical critical and post-modern approaches have shaped the reading of the canon will be a focus of class discussions.

AC4316 New Testament Survey (Fall) (3 undergraduate credits)

As an introductory survey of the history, literature, and message of the New Testament, the course traces the unfolding of over-arching themes, narrative storyline, and intertextual relationships as experienced in its religious Jewish context within Greco-Roman society. How Christian, rabbinic and historical critical approaches shaped the reading of the canon will be a focus of class discussions.

AC4316-SL New Testament Survey (Fall) (3 undergraduate credits)

As an introductory survey of the history, literature, and message of the New Testament, the course traces the unfolding of over-arching themes, narrative storyline, and intertextual relationships as experienced in its religious Jewish context within Greco-Roman society. How Christian, rabbinic and historical critical approaches shaped the reading of the canon will be a focus of class discussions.

AC4341 Arabic 1 (Fall) (3 undergraduate credits)

This course introduces the student to Modern Standard Arabic and Arab culture. Students will learn the Arabic alphabet, basic grammar, and a vocabulary of 400 words in acquiring basic speaking and reading proficiency.

AC4342 Arabic 2 (Spring) (3 undergraduate credits)

This course is the second step toward learning Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It will help the student to achieve advanced beginner-level proficiency in speaking, reading, listening, and writing, accessing a vocabulary of 800 words. The student will also be introduced to important aspects of Arab culture.

AC4343 Arabic 3 (Spring) (3 undergraduate credits)

This course is the third step toward learning to read Arabic. It will enable students to read significant Abrahamic texts in classical and Modern Standard Arabic.

AC4344 Colloquial Arabic 1 (Upon demand) (3 undergraduate credits)

This course enables students to speak a dialect of Arabic at a beginning level using either traditional classroom methodologies or else a Growing Participatory Approach (GPA). If the latter, then students will meet in small groups with a native-speaker language consultant, under the instructor’s guidance. The dialect offered will depend upon the language consultants that are available for the course.

AC4392 Special Projects in Abrahamic Studies (TBA) (3 undergraduate credits)

Students will complete a project in Abrahamic studies. This course may be repeated when the topic changes with permission of the student’s advisor.

Graduate Courses

AC5191 Thesis (Spring/Fall) (1 graduate credit)

By permission of your graduate advisor; graded P/F; may be repeated.

AC5241 Arabic 1 (Fall) (2 graduate credits)

This course introduces the student to Modern Standard Arabic and Arab culture. Students will learn the Arabic alphabet, basic grammar, a vocabulary of 400 words and basic speaking and reading proficiency.

AC5242 Arabic 2 (Spring) (2 graduate credits)

This course is the second step toward learning Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It will help the student to achieve advance beginner-level proficiency in speaking, reading, listening, and writing, accessing a vocabulary of 800 words. The student will also be introduced to basic aspects of Arab culture.

AC5243 Arabic 3 (Spring) (2 graduate credits)

This course is the third step toward learning to read Arabic. It will enable students to read significant Abrahamic texts in classical and Modern Standard Arabic.

AC5244 Colloquial Arabic 1 (Upon demand) (2 graduate credits)

This course enables students to speak a dialect of Arabic at a beginning level using either traditional classroom methodologies or else a Growing Participator Approach (GPA). If the latter, then students will meet in small groups with a native-speaker language consultant, under the instructor’s guidance. The dialect offered will depend upon the language consultants that are available for the course.

AC5306 New Testament in Its First Century Context (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

As an introduction to the New Testament in its first century context, this course traces the unfolding of over-arching themes, narrative storyline, and intertextual relationships as understood by various Jewish and Gentile audiences in the first century of the Roman Empire. Special attention is given to communicating over-arching themes through storytelling.

AC5306-SL New Testament in Its First Century Context (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

As an introduction to the New Testament in its first century context, this course traces the unfolding of over-arching themes, narrative storyline, and intertextual relationships as understood by various Jewish and Gentile audiences in the first century of the Roman Empire. Special attention is given to communicating over-arching themes through storytelling.

AC5309 Theology of Translation (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course explores translation studies at the intersection of applied linguistics and theology. This course will provide resources for students to develop methods for assessing and improving biblical translation at theological levels.

Note: For Applied Linguistics, see AL5309

AC5309-SL Theology of Translation (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course explores translation studies at the intersection of applied linguistics and theology. . This course will provide resources for students to develop methods for assessing and improving biblical translation at theological levels.

AC5310 Core Components of Islam (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course examines key elements which must be understood in relating to Muslims: beliefs, values, assumptions, allegiances, and cultural, social, communal, and religious dynamics. Attention is given to both traditional and critical approaches to the study of Islam’s history and the development of diverse, contemporary social, political and religious expressions. Particular emphasis is given to areas calling for sensitive or creative communication and lifestyle in order to overcome relational obstacles in working toward individual and community transformation.

AC5310-OL Core Components of Islam (Online) (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course examines key elements which must be understood in relating to Muslims: beliefs, values, assumptions, allegiances, and cultural, social, communal, and religious dynamics. Attention is given to both traditional and critical approaches to the study of Islam’s history and the development of diverse, contemporary social, political and religious expressions. Particular emphasis is given to areas calling for sensitive or creative communication and lifestyle in order to overcome relational obstacles in working toward individual and community transformation.

AC5310-SL Core Components of Islam (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course examines key elements which must be understood in relating to Muslims: beliefs, values, assumptions, allegiances, and cultural, social, communal, and religious dynamics. Attention is given to both traditional and critical approaches to the study of Islam’s history and the development of diverse, contemporary social, political and religious expressions. Particular emphasis is given to areas calling for sensitive or creative communication and lifestyle in order to overcome relational obstacles in working toward individual and community transformation.

AC5312 Islam in the 21st Century (TBA) (3 graduate credits)

This course explores practical and ideological variations within Islam’s current social, anthropological, political and economic concepts and structures, noting struggles with contemporary development needs, modernization, and relations with the West, in general. Insights that can facilitate understanding, communications, and relationship building between East and West will be noted and emphasized.

AC5314-SL Modern Islamic Religious and Political Movements (Upon demand) (3 graduate credits)

This course focuses on contemporary Islamic reform and revitalization movements, their rise and development, current status, and implications for Muslim self-understanding. Particular attention is given to the Muslim Brotherhood, the Gulen Movement, and to the secularists who emerged from the Arab Spring. Along with brief background information on Islam, this course lays the foundation of current trends, examines the issues behind the militant movement, suggests some possible responses, and looks at the competing ideological struggle between modernity and fundamentalism. Special attention will be given to understanding and constructively responding to the historical Middle East conflict.

AC5315 Abrahamic Monotheism: Abrahamic faiths, their origins and interactions (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course explores the origins and characteristics of monotheism including ways that religious cultures with no prior history of this concept have adopted it.  The course considers “Abrahamic” and “non-Abrahamic” forms of monotheism within cultural life, individual identity and cross-cultural encounter.

AC5316-OL Contextualization Issues Among Muslim Peoples (Online) (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course seeks to explore the nature of culturally sensitive service (contextualization) as it applies to Islamic settings, noting the history, challenges, limitations, chief components, successes and failures of such activities.  Attention is given to the widespread presence of animistic practices among Muslim peoples, the nature of those expressions and the special challenges they present to culturally relevant service.  Appropriate guidelines for effective service will be explored.

AC5318 Understanding the Qur'an (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This study of the Qur’an examines its organization, history of compilation, variant manuscript readings, and major themes. Students will become familiar with the major approaches to its interpretation, historical subtext in the Qur’an, and how this affects interpretation of key texts in light of the Jewish and Christian scriptures. Practical issues of etiquette, characteristics of various English translations, and how to read the Qur’an will also be studied.

AC5318-SL Understanding the Qur'an (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This study of the Qur’an examines its organization, history of compilation, variant manuscript readings, and major themes. Students will become familiar with the major approaches to its interpretation, historical subtext in the Qur’an, and how this affects interpretation of key texts in light of the Jewish and Christian scriptures. Practical issues of etiquette, characteristics of various English translations, and how to read the Qur’an will also be studied.

AC5319 Abrahamic Messianism (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

The symbol of the messianic (for savior and eschatological figures) has emerged as one of the most transferable of cultural and religious categories. This course serves as a basis for understanding some of the profound theological, cultural, and political implications of the symbol in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam into the modern era. Connections to non-Abrahamic traditions will also be studied.

AC5321-PR Abrahamic Community Internship (Spring/Summer/Fall) (3 graduate credits)

The Abrahamic Community Internship is designed to enable students to serve cross-culturally in and with Abrahamic communities and organizations, based on respectful understanding of their beliefs and practices, engendering humanitarian contributions to local and global cultural goals. The internship is a structured field experience where students utilize, integrate and/or apply information from their previous coursework in Abrahamic studies. The internship involves both instructional and crosscultural experiential components, providing mentoring throughout the process. It will focus on providing skills and modifying behavior and attitudes through engagement with people of a significantly different Abrahamic culture or religious tradition, helping the student to attain readiness for service in Abrahamic communities.

AC5322 Abrahamic Worldviews: Shared Stories (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course explores hermeneutical issues central to the understanding and interpretation of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim sacred texts, examining stories shared by all three traditions. The approach to each narrative is to describe its components, explain its Abrahamic worldview context, and then use intertextual analysis to reformulate shared themes and retell the story in new cultural contexts.

AC5322-SL Abrahamic Worldviews: Shared Stories (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course explores hermeneutical issues central to the understanding and interpretation of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim sacred texts, examining stories shared by all three traditions. The approach to each narrative is to describe its components, explain its Abrahamic worldview context, and then use intertextual analysis to reformulate shared themes and retell the story in new cultural contexts.

AC5391 Thesis (Spring/Fall) (3 graduate credits)

By permission of your graduate advisor; graded P/F; may be repeated.

AC5392 Special Projects in Abrahamic Studies (TBA) (3 graduate credits)

Students will complete a project in Abrahamic studies. This course may be repeated when the topic changes with permission of the student’s advisor.

AC5394 Readings in Abrahamic Studies (TBA) (3 graduate credits)

Students will read selected books and articles on one or more aspects of Abrahamic studies and will be able to discuss their content. They will write a paper or complete a practical project with the approval of their advisor.