GIAL Courses

Applied Anthropology courses start with AA and Applied Linguistics courses start with AL. Click to view a filterable list of all Dallas International course offerings.

Undergraduate Courses

AA4150 Introduction to Language Development (Spring/Fall) (1 undergraduate credit)

This course is designed to provide students a “big picture” of language development, including its place within the wider context of community development, its theological/philosophical foundations and its relationship to activities such as Bible translation, research, literacy and education.  This course is designed to run in parallel with AA4350 Language & Society and is required for those desiring to serve with SIL International.

AA4170a Cultural Anthropology (research supplement) (Spring/Fall) (1 undergraduate credit)

This course emphasizes ethnographic research methods and analysis. After completing this course, students will have satisfied GIAL’s requirements in this regard.

AA4350 Language and Society (Spring/Fall) (3 undergraduate credits)

This course considers the relationship between language and society. After successfully completing the course, students will be able to articulate the multilingual nature of the world’s societies, the
function(s) of language(s) in nations, and how different languages are used alongside one another, including the idea of diglossia. They will also be able to identify the factors influencing the choice among language varieties for national and educational use. In addition, students will be able to explain how language attitudes and domains of language use influence the long-term maintenance and/or shift of language(s) in society. They will be able to discuss how all the aforementioned may possibly affect an applied anthropology program for a given linguistic community.

AA4357 Genres of Oral Tradition (Fall) (3 undergraduate credits)

Oral traditions, especially storytelling, may include aspects of entertainment, but they are art forms and a discipline of academic study.  This introductory course will integrate information from various disciplines and include topics that contribute to and are related to the general field of oral traditions. The course examines four broad genres of oral traditions: proverbs, riddles, verse, stories. For each of these four genres, the course covers three approaches: How to collect/observe the genre; How to analyze the genre; and How to apply the genre in ways that benefit the community.

AA4370 Cultural Anthropology (Spring/Fall) (3 undergraduate credits)

This course is an introduction to cultural anthropology with emphases on application and several research methods. The main assignment is a practicum or research project that includes having students make at least four study-visits outside class hours to a Dallas/Fort Worth-area cross-cultural social situation.

AA4370-OL Cultural Anthropology (Summer) (3 undergraduate credits)

This course is an undergraduate-level introduction to cultural anthropology with emphasis on application and research methods. Students complete a practicum or research project that includes at least four study-visits outside class hours to a cross-cultural social situation.

AA4372 Political and Social Systems (Spring) (3 undergraduate credits)

This course is an introduction to political and social systems worldwide. Subjects treated include basic types of political organizations, concepts and practices of authority, power, law, and decision-making.

AA4387 Training in Cross-Cultural Contexts (Spring) (3 undergraduate credits)

The course reviews adult learning theory. Students design and teach learning sessions to people of their own culture and to people of another culture, and analyze some of the cultural factors affecting learning and teaching.

AA4505 Second Language and Culture Acquisition (Spring/Fall) (5 undergraduate credits)

Students will learn to identify and apply their own language and culture learning styles; manage language learning; use appropriate techniques and activities to develop second language competence at the novice level while working with a native speaker in language learning sessions. They will be able to describe techniques and activities suitable for language learning at more advanced levels. Building on awareness of their own cultural values, they will be able to describe and will begin to implement strategies for dealing appropriately with differences in cultural values.

AL4207 Field Data Management (Spring/Fall) (2 undergraduate credits)

With a focus on methodology and good praxis, this course instructs students, in the use of computational tools for managing and presenting phonological, textual, and lexical data collected in linguistic field research.

AL4302 Principles of Articulatory and Acoustic Phonetics (Spring/Fall) (3 undergraduate credits)

Using an augmented subset of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), students will be able to identify, mimic, and transcribe sounds and prosodies in normal human speech and to describe the mechanisms by which a speaker produces these sounds.  Students will also be introduced to basic techniques of acoustic analysis.

AL4303 Principles of Phonological Analysis (Spring/Fall) (3 undergraduate credits)

This course provides practice in recognizing the difference between phonetic (etic) and phonological (emic) data through numerous practical exercises. Theoretical topics of focus include the use of distinctive features, natural classes, phonetic plausibility, complementary distribution, free variation, contrast in identical/analogous environments, phonological processes, common conditioning environ-ments, typological universals, tone analysis, and morphophonemics. This is an ideal course for field-workers preparing to help develop or revise an orthography for any language.

AL4303-SL Principles of Phonological Analysis (Spring/Fall) (3 undergraduate credits)

This course provides practice in recognizing the difference between phonetic (etic) and phonological (emic) data through numerous practical exercises. Theoretical topics of focus include the use of distinctive features, natural classes, phonetic plausibility, complementary distribution, free variation, contrast in identical/analogous environments, phonological processes, common conditioning environ-ments, typological universals, tone analysis, and morphophonemics. This is an ideal course for field-workers preparing to help develop or revise an orthography for any language.

AL4304 Introduction to Language Structure (Spring/Fall) (3 undergraduate credits)

This course provides a basic introduction to language sounds and structures. It will enhance students’ ability to learn another language as they use natural language data to discover and analyze word and sentence formation in a variety of different languages. Students will also have the opportunity to identify, pronounce, and transcribe the most common sounds found in the world’s languages.

Note: This course serves as a prerequisite for AA4505 in lieu of AL4302 and AL4410, but not as a prerequisite for any AL course.

AL4304-OL Introduction to Language Structure (Spring/Fall) (3 undergraduate credits)

This course provides a basic introduction to language sounds and structures. It will enhance students’ ability to learn another language as they use natural language data to discover and analyze word and sentence formation in a variety of different languages. Students will also have the opportunity to identify, pronounce, and transcribe the most common sounds found in the world’s languages.

Note: This course serves as a prerequisite for AA4505 in lieu of AL4302 and AL4410, but not as a prerequisite for any AL course.

AL4406 Field Methods and Linguistic Analysis (Spring/Fall) (4 undergraduate credits)

Working with a speaker of a non-western language, students in this course elicit data which they then use to analyze the phonological system and produce a mini-lexicon and a grammar sketch of the target language.

AL4410 Principles of Grammatical Analysis (Spring/Fall) (4 undergraduate credits)

This course introduces students to techniques for analyzing and describing basic morphological and syntactic issues in natural languages. By working through numerous practical exercises from a large variety of languages, students gain confidence in their ability to determine word classes and allomorphy and to deal with inflectional and derivational morphology. Students also learn to analyze different types of phrases, clauses, and sentences. This course serves as a prerequisite for several graduate linguistics courses.

AL4410-SL Principles of Grammatical Analysis (Spring/Fall) (4 undergraduate credits)

This course introduces students to techniques for analyzing and describing basic morphological and syntactic issues in natural languages. By working through numerous practical exercises from a large variety of languages, students gain confidence in their ability to determine word classes and allomorphy and to deal with inflectional and derivational morphology. Students also learn to analyze different types of phrases, clauses, and sentences. This course serves as a prerequisite for several graduate linguistics courses.

Graduate Courses

AA5151 Cross-Cultural Teaching Seminar (Spring/Fall) (1 graduate credit)

The Cross-cultural teaching seminar allows students to analyze a teaching process from the perspective of both learning and teaching styles, and identify factors relevant to teaching cross-culturally.

AA5151-SL Cross-Cultural Teaching Seminar (Spring/Fall) (1 graduate credit)

The Cross-cultural teaching seminar allows students to analyze a teaching process from the perspective of both learning and teaching styles, and identify factors relevant to teaching cross-culturally.

AA5190 Thesis Writing (Spring/Fall) (1 graduate credit)

This course covers techniques and skill development for researching and writing a thesis. Topics include distinction between quantitative and qualitative research and the uses, advantages and disadvantages of each, Word style sheets and use of a thesis template to enforce the required style sheet, common parts of a research paper/thesis, description and implement of the proposal writing process, ethical perspectives and implications for research, and problem areas in technical writing and critical thinking.

Note: This course is graded P/F. Completion of the course will count as one hour of thesis credit but will not trigger the requirement for continuing registration. For applied linguistics see AL5190.

AA5191 Thesis (Spring/Fall) (1 graduate credit)

By permission of graduate advisor; graded P/F; may be repeated.

AA5321-OL Multicultural Teamwork (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course addresses issues relating to forming practical, cooperative programs that depend upon people from different cultures working together as teams or as full partners. The course draws upon writings of western and non-western authors, case studies, lectures, and group activities. Upon completing this course, the student will be able to form teams and partnerships, effectively work in teams, and train others in teamwork and partnership. In this course, the term “teamwork” refers not only to closely knit teams but to many kinds of cooperative action that requires groups of people to work together toward a common goal. Christian perspectives on teamwork underlie the course.

AA5323 Multicultural Leadership (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course explores the implications multi-cultural settings have for leadership, specifically the impact cultural values, beliefs and worldviews have on leadership definitions, leadership styles, communications, authority and accountability dynamics, decision-making procedures, conflict management and ethics. Attention is given to biblical input for faith-based organizations in wrestling with the multi-cultural arena as well as dealing with practical cultural expressions which often reflect conflicting assumptions and allegiances. Suggestions are made for constructive responses to a variety of multi-cultural issues. A student who has taken this course and its prerequisites will be able to lead people who are working together from a variety of cultural backgrounds.

AA5325-OL Foundations of Cross-Cultural Service (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course examines the relationship between cross-cultural communication and cross-cultural transformation. By the end of this course, students will be able to examine the history of cultural or cross-cultural movements, and discuss key factors involved in such movements. Students will also be able to discuss their potential place within such movements.

AA5333 Principles of Literacy (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

Students in this course study principles of culture and language relevant to working with language communities to plan literacy programs and prepare literacy materials. The course involves both studying ideas, but also hands-on creating of a spelling system, literacy primers, transition literacy materials. The course also covers training of teachers, funding, and program sustainability.

AA5337 Readings in Ethnology (Spring/Fall) (3 graduate credits)

Starting from a set of instructor-recommended sources, students read or consult selected ones on a topic or area of ethnology. They complete an annotated bibliography of key sources and either a paper or practical project. Students meet with the instructor once or twice a week to discuss sources and progress on course requirements.

AA5340 Ethnographic Research Methods (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

A wide variety of field methods for collecting ethnographic data is explored. Students have the opportunity to engage in a practicum in which to apply field methods to particular social contexts, demonstrating their ability in specific field methods.

AA5341 Social Science Research Design and Methods (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course is for developing researchers to learn the application of basic principles of the scientific method to the design of a research project. Topics and practical application of topics include research questions, variables related to research questions, testable hypotheses, and data-gathering instruments and methods.

AA5342 Statistical Methods (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

Appropriate statistical methods for research in linguistics and related areas are considered. Course discussion includes the claims that can and cannot be made with statistics.

AA5342-SL Statistical Methods (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

Appropriate statistical methods for research in linguistics and related areas are considered. Course discussion includes the claims that can and cannot be made with statistics.

AA5343 Principles of Multilingual Education (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

Discussion in this course begins with the intersection of education and multilingualism in developing countries. Included are major perspectives on bilingualism, cognitive dimensions of bilingualism, and educational consequences of bilingualism. Comparison of various models of multilingual education with their strengths and weaknesses is considered. The question of what we can learn from major experiments in multilingual education launched in the last 40 years is a discussion topic. A key element of the course is consideration of implementation-related issues involved in organizing a multilingual education program, especially in a developing country.

AA5344 Comparative International Education (TBA) (3 graduate credits)

This course includes several seminal topics that include the varying philosophies of education in today’s world; the inter-relationship between educational policy and national aspirations & social objectives; and inter-relationship between linguistic diversity, educational outcomes, and educational policy. Students discuss competing theories on improving educational outcomes; the problems of achieving universal primary education; the cost-benefit problem affecting educational choice in developing countries; and the procedures and methodologies which underlie research in comparative international education.

AA5349 Readings in Literacy (Spring/Fall) (3 graduate credits)

After completing this course, students will have read six books on a particular aspect of the literacy task chosen from a recommended set and be able to discuss their content. They will also have written a paper or completed a practical project on that topic.

AA5352 Language Program Design and Management (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course engages students in strategic planning procedures for sociolinguistic research that identifies key national and local factors most likely to influence a language-development program for a linguistic community. The course will highlight fundamental management skills crucial for partnering with any sponsoring agencies and the local community, with attention given to training local citizens for greater involvement in language-development program activities.

AA5353 Language Development and Planning (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

The course addresses language-planning principles from an interdisciplinary perspective and applies these in language-development projects. The many topics included are status planning, involving language choice, policy and use decisions at the international, national, and local levels; corpus planning, involving graphization, standardization, and modernization; acquisition planning, involving the provision of opportunity and incentive to adopt innovations; and ethical issues relating to language rights and language ecology.

AA5354 Language Contact (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

The purpose of this course is to discuss phenomena which occur when speakers of different languages come in contact with each other, including such areas as multilingualism (societal and individual), creolistics (Pidgins and Creoles), and obsolescence (language maintenance, shift, and death, language-contact-induced language change, reversing language shift, etc.).

AA5355 Scripture Engagement Strategy and Methods (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course focuses on the sociolinguistic, socioeconomic, sociopolitical, and socio-religious factors that either hinder or foster the use of vernacular literature. Practical strategies and activities that promote the use of Bible translations in public and private venues are central.

AA5355-OL Scripture Engagement Strategy and Methods (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course focuses on the sociolinguistic, socioeconomic, sociopolitical, and socio-religious factors that either hinder or foster the use of vernacular literature. Practical strategies and activities that promote the use of Bible translations in public and private venues are central.

Note: Online versions of this course require access to an internet connection capable of supporting video conferencing at least once a week.

AA5356-OL Current Issues in Scripture Engagement (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

What are the major issues influencing Scripture engagement below the surface? This course encourages the student to analyze motivations and causal elements that underlie many of the Scripture engagement choices people make. Using a partially student-designed approach, course participants select specific Scripture engagement issues and skills they are interested in exploring more comprehensively. Emerging topics related to Scripture engagement are debated and students propose original contributions to the field of Scripture engagement. Students also develop skills in consulting and workshop design.

Note: Online versions of this course require access to an internet connection capable of supporting video conferencing at least once a week.

AA5357 Oral Tradition and Literature (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

The course examines four broad genres of oral traditions: proverbs, riddles, verse, stories. For each of these four genres, the course covers three approaches: 1)   How to collect/observe the genre, 2) How to analyze the genre, 3) How to apply the genre in ways that benefit the community. Each student will select a community/area to study during this course. The student will study proverbs, riddle, verse, and stories in the area of their choice and write a paper about each. At the end of the course, each student will propose at least two ways to apply the community’s oral arts in a way that benefits the community.

AA5361 Principles of Language Survey (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

Students study the linguistic and sociolinguistic criteria that can be used to define language and dialect boundaries. They learn to form appropriate research questions and choose appropriate research tools to discover ethnolinguistic identity, determine linguistic similarity, measure inherent intelligibility, assess bilingual proficiency, and describe language attitudes and patterns of language use. To implement these ideas, each student selects a particular language community in the world and prepares an appropriate survey proposal for this community.

AA5362 Language Survey Methods (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

Students study a variety of survey tools, then construct their own examples of these tests, implement them by using them with real people, and then write reports about their results

AA5364 Theories and Practices in Community Development (TBA) (3 graduate credits)

After completing this course, students will be able: (a) to evaluate philosophies, processes and practices of community development; (b) to discuss several kinds of appropriate technologies at work; (c) to demonstrate one appropriate technology; (d) to collect, analyze, and report on cases of introduced change; and (e) to formulate a plan for introducing an appropriate technology into a specific community.

AA5366 Theory and Practice of Sociolinguistics (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

Students study and discuss sociolinguistic variation at the level of a single language. Topics include such matters as the theory of variation; dialectology; ethnography of communication; pragmatics (power, solidarity, politeness); language and gender; social factors (time, generation, social class, social network, and identity); and standard and non-standard usage.

AA5368 Seminar in Sociolinguistics (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

By the end of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of a selected topic in sociolinguistics through the production of a written, (nearly) publishable paper on some aspect of that topic. Class discussions will focus on the areas of student interest within the selected topic and be student-led. (May be repeated when the topic changes.)

AA5372 Social and Political Organization (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

The course is an introduction to social and political organization worldwide. Subjects treated include social groups of various kinds and their principles of recruitment and organization – e.g., kinship, descent, marriage, residence, age, and choice. Also treated are various kinds of social and political relations, rites of passage for both persons and groups, basic types of political organization, concepts and practices of authority, power, law, and decision-making.

Note: If a student desires to complete the Graduate Certificate in Multicultural Teamwork in one term, it will also be taught in the FALL.

AA5373 Religion and Worldview (Fall - Even numbered years) (3 graduate credits)

The course is an introduction to the range of religious systems of minority peoples worldwide, including universal religions and their folk varieties. Subjects treated include how religion has been defined by anthropologists and treated within anthropology. There is comparison and contrast of Christian and secular anthropological approaches to religion. There is a certain focus on witches and witch ontologies and how they compare to biblical idols.

AA5374 Christianity Across Cultures (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

The emergence of World Christianity and the growth of the church in the southern hemisphere has shifted the focus of mission toward questions concerning the components of Christianity that are variable across cultures. The course will explore questions of cultural context and tradition, the world Christian movement, the meaning and expression of contextualization and syncretism, and the cross-cultural embodiment of Christianity through conversion, ritual and worship, incarnational ministry, and church models. Through the analysis of case studies students will explore how Christianity is challenged to address social values, needs, and behaviors across a wide range of cultures, ethnic groups, and religious traditions.

AA5375 Culture Change & Minority Cultures (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course is an introduction to culture change in today’s minority cultures, especially as encountered by and of interest to an applied Christian anthropology. Class activities and assignments concern change and change-related phenomena and issues from cultures and larger contact situations around the world; they concern the process of sociocultural change as well. There is a focus on how these phenomena and issues and the change process are relevant to the work of applied Christian anthropologists in minority cultures.

AA5377 Area Studies (Fall - Odd numbered years) (3 graduate credits)

The course is an introduction to the geography, history, cultures, language families of interest, and other aspects of one area or sub-area of the world. Cultures are emphasized. Areas may be all or significant parts (not single countries) of sub-Saharan Africa, the Americas, Asia, Eurasia, or Oceania, depending on instructor availability.

AA5387 Training Across Cultures (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

To prepare for teaching and training people of different cultures, this course introduces students to adult learning theory, and equips them to analyze cultural factors affecting teaching and learning.

AA5387-SL Training Across Cultures (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

To prepare for teaching and training people of different cultures, this course introduces students to adult learning theory, and equips them to analyze cultural factors affecting teaching and learning.

AA5391 Thesis (Spring/Fall) (3 graduate credits)

By permission of graduate advisor; graded P/F; may be repeated.

AA5392-PR Scripture Engagement Practicum (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

Students learn to research a people group’s religious worldview and help provide the most appropriate materials and activities that enhance the community’s engagement with Scripture.  They work with local authors, artists, teachers or media specialists to create print materials, performances and recordings tailored for specific audiences. They encourage communities to engage with Scripture and apply it to their lives through study, story, song, conversation and celebration. They partner with leaders to strengthen community engagement with Scripture at more times and in more ways.

AA5395 Readings in Applied Anthropology (TBA) (3 graduate credits)

Students will read selected books and articles on one or more aspects of language development, chosen in discussion with the professor. They will write a paper or complete a practical project on the topic, decided with the professor.

AA5934 Literacy Megacourse (Spring) (9 graduate credits)

Check out our Literacy Megacourse Scholarship for Spring 2019!

This course covers a wide variety of topics related to literacy programs in developing contexts. Many of the topics are reinforced by hands-on projects involving writing systems, teaching materials, transition materials, budget preparation, etc.

Note: Students should also be aware that there will be some scheduled activities outside normal class hours.

AL5190 Thesis Writing (Spring/Fall) (1 graduate credit)

This course covers techniques and skill development for researching and writing a thesis. It is strongly recommended for all students writing a thesis at the master’s level. Students completing this course will be able to describe different kinds of knowledge and ways of knowing and how each is acquired; distinguish between quantitative and qualitative research and the uses, advantages, and disadvantages of each; describe Word style sheets and use a thesis template to enforce the required style sheet; identify common parts of a research paper/thesis and what is included in each part; describe and implement the proposal writing process; identify ethical perspectives and implications for research; and identify problem areas in technical writing and critical thinking.

Note:  This course is graded P/F.  Completion of this course will count as one hour of thesis credit but will not trigger the requirement for continuing registration. For Applied Anthropology, see AA5190.

AL5191 Thesis (Spring/Fall) (1 graduate credit)

By permission of graduate advisor; graded P/F; may be repeated.

AL5207 Field Data Management (Spring/Fall) (2 graduate credits)

With a focus on methodology and good praxis, this course instructs students in the use of computational tools for managing and presenting phonological, textual, and lexical data collected in linguistic field research.

AL5304 Advanced Phonological Analysis (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course introduces students to advanced analyses and descriptions of the phonology of human languages from various theoretical perspectives, including Optimality Theory. Analytical and descriptive skills will be developed through the study of phonological data from a variety of natural languages, focusing on morphophonemics. Readings are designed to provide a solid introduction to several important issues in phonological theory and argumentation.

AL5308 Oral Translation (Spring/Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course introduces students to orality and its implications for Bible translation. The concepts of teaching within an oral framework and the internalization of a pericope will be explored along with the process of oral drafting. Finally, the student will participate in the oral translation of Scripture.

AL5308-SL Oral Translation (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course introduces students to orality and its implications for Bible translation. The concepts of teaching within an oral framework and the internalization of a pericope will be explored along with the process of oral drafting. Finally, the student will participate in the oral translation of Scripture.

AL5309 Philosophy of Translation (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course explores translation studies at the intersection of applied linguistics and theology. This course will provide resources for students to develop methods for assessing and improving biblical translation at theological levels.

Note: For Abraham Center, see AC5309.

AL5311 Relevance Theory (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

Beginning with the historical and theoretical roots of relevance theory, this course explores relevance theory’s account of the principles and mechanisms of human communication. Building on that theoretical foundation, students explore implications of the theory for our explanation of tropes, linguistic analysis, and interlingual communication.

AL5312 Discourse Analysis (Spring/Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course is designed to help students understand how different languages structure texts and how the resulting structure may affect communication and translation. The course focuses on the discourse structure of narrative texts, although a brief survey of the structure of non-narrative texts is included at the end of the course. Students practice analyzing texts for various discourse features. Some issues considered are sentence structures, macrosegmentation of texts, the use of particles and conjunctions, and information structure. Salience schemes, transitivity, participant reference, and paragraph analysis are some of the other topics included.

AL5312-SL Discourse Analysis (Spring/Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course is designed to help students understand how different languages structure texts and how the resulting structure may affect communication and translation. The course focuses on the discourse structure of narrative texts, although a brief survey of the structure of non-narrative texts is included at the end of the course. Students practice analyzing texts for various discourse features. Some issues considered are sentence structures, macrosegmentation of texts, the use of particles and conjunctions, and information structure. Salience schemes, transitivity, participant reference, and paragraph analysis are some of the other topics included.

AL5313 Advanced Grammatical Analysis (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course provides a survey of recurring syntactic patterns across languages and introduces tools and strategies that can be used to analyze and describe the grammatical structure of individual languages. Topics covered include voice and valence alternations, complementation, control, raising, relativization, morphological causatives, and serial verbs. This course is required for all students in the Descriptive Linguistics concentration and is a prerequisite for AL5395 Current Issues in Descriptive Linguistics.

AL5313-SL Advanced Grammatical Analysis (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course provides a survey of recurring syntactic patterns across languages and introduces tools and strategies that can be used to analyze and describe the grammatical structure of individual languages. Topics covered include voice and valence alternations, complementation, control, raising, relativization, morphological causatives, and serial verbs. This course is required for all students in the Descriptive Linguistics concentration and is a prerequisite for AL5395 Current Issues in Descriptive Linguistics.

AL5315 Semantics and Pragmatics (Spring/Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course examines the relationship between form and meaning in human language. We consider the rules for combining word meanings to derive sentence meanings in a predictable way, and we explore the principles which allow speakers to communicate more by uttering a sentence than is contained in the sentence meaning itself. We apply these concepts not only to content words but also to grammatical morphemes such as tense, aspect, and modality markers. This course is required for the MA in Applied Linguistics and satisfies the prerequisite for AL5316 Theory and Practice of Translation.

AL5315-SL Semantics and Pragmatics (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course examines the relationship between form and meaning in human language. We consider the rules for combining word meanings to derive sentence meanings in a predictable way, and we explore the principles which allow speakers to communicate more by uttering a sentence than is contained in the sentence meaning itself. We apply these concepts not only to content words but also to grammatical morphemes such as tense, aspect, and modality markers. This course is required for the MA in Applied Linguistics and satisfies the prerequisite for AL5316 Theory and Practice of Translation.

AL5316 Theory and Practice of Translation (Spring/Fall) (3 graduate credits)

Explores a theoretical understanding of translation as it impacts translating and advising translators. Students explore the implications of translation theory and common practice for several translation issues. In addition to reading and discussion, students experientially learn principles and procedures through class projects.

AL5316-SL Theory and Practice of Translation (Spring/Fall) (3 graduate credits)

Explores a theoretical understanding of translation as it impacts translating and advising translators. Students explore the implications of translation theory and common practice for several translation issues. In addition to reading and discussion, students experientially learn principles and procedures through class projects.

AL5317 Language Documentation (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course involves reading and synthesizing major concepts in the foundational literature, as well as more recent publications in documentary linguistics. The readings are augmented by training in the core technical tasks of a language documentation project, including project planning, audio and video recording, metadata management, and archiving. A final project working with language consultants brings together the theoretical concepts and the technical skills in a small documentary corpus.

AL5318 Applied Exegesis (TBA) (3 graduate credits)

Students taking this course analyze the structure and argumentation of selected Old or New Testament texts in Hebrew or Greek, with particular reference to exegetical and hermeneutical issues.

AL5319 Biblical Backgrounds (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course is an investigation of three primary sources for understanding biblical backgrounds: the religious environment of ancient Israel, narratives of key biblical figures as cultural memory texts of ancient Israel within the context of the ancient Middle East, and the place of Jesus throughout the books of the New Testament considering its Second Temple religious environment. These approaches provide valuable insight for readers of the Bible everywhere as they perform their own contextual interpretations.

AL5320 Translation Consulting Skills (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course contributes to students’ professional growth in the consulting skills and attitudes needed to successfully function as translation advisors and consultants. Students develop a personal growth plan for translation consultants. Class sessions are discussion that incorporates each participant’s knowledge and experience. Students put into practice the skills and attitudes that are discussed.

AL5321 Greek 1 (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course introduces students to the grammar and vocabulary of Biblical Greek with a focus on reading, studying, and translating the Greek New Testament. It offers a quick and efficient path into reading the Greek New Testament. The course is designed for anyone wanting to become a Bible translator and desiring to learn Biblical Greek.

AL5322 Greek 2 (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course is built in tandem with AL5321. Students continue studying Koine Greek with a focus on syntax and fluent reading of the Greek New Testament. This course is available for any student who has successfully completed AL5321 and has good reading comprehension of the Greek Text.

AL5323 Greek Discourse Features (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course is designed to enable the student of the Greek New Testament to better understand the text, going beyond basic grammatical analysis. To that end, the course considers the discourse function of connectors in the Greek New Testament. Other topics covered include framing devices, emphasis, points of departure, and other issues in information structure. Forward pointing devices, thematic highlighting devices, and constituent structure are additional topics.

AL5324 Greek Textual Analysis (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course is concerned with discovering the meaning of a New Testament text as intended by the original author. As an aid in that discovery process, students are introduced to textual criticism. Also covered is how to best do lexical studies. The course looks at issues in grammatical analysis, background studies, and how to proceed in various genres of texts: narrative, epistolary, and apocalyptic. The use of the Old Testament in the New Testament is surveyed as well as the use of biblical theology in interpretation. Finally, each student puts all the elements together to produce an exegetical paper over an assigned text.

AL5325 Hebrew Textual Analysis (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

In this course students learn the steps needed to evaluate and understand the original authors intended meaning of Old Testament passages. As part of this process, students learn how to evaluate lexical and syntactical issues, interact with textual criticism, perform background studies, and interact with the various genres of the text. These steps enable students to interpret the original meaning and underlying theology in order to translate well and to apply the text, which students demonstrate in an exegetical paper over an assigned text.

AL5326 Hebrew 1 (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

This course introduces students to the foundational features of Classical Hebrew. Beginning with the basics of phonology, the course then moves into foundational morphology and grammar, including nouns, prepositions, and verbs. This introduction to the language is the first step in enabling the student to become a competent translator of the Hebrew Old Testament.

AL5327 Hebrew 2 (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course continues where AL5326 left off. It continues introducing students to the basic morphology and grammar of Classical Hebrew. Once the foundational elements are understood, the course introduces students to the translation of large portions of text over a variety of genre types. This course (along with the previous one) provides a solid foundation for understanding the basic features of the language and prepares students to move into the following course which teaches the more complex features of interpretation.

AL5328 Hebrew Discourse Features (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

Through this course students move beyond traditional grammatical analysis to an analysis and evaluation of the various discourse features of the Hebrew Old Testament. The types of discourse features studied include: discourse types, participant reference, coherence and cohesion, information structure, and many other features. The field of Hebrew discourse analysis is flourishing, and this course is updated every year to include the most recent advancements in the field.

AL5329 Readings in Biblical Texts & Translation Practicum: Hebrew Poetry (Spring) (3 graduate credits)

Students develop their language skills by reading extended passages of Old Testament texts of different genres in Hebrew. In this particular class students will focus developing their skills in analyzing complete poems in Hebrew in order to explain the functional meaning and pragmatic effect of the Hebrew text. Completion of this course will include translating a text from the Hebrew Bible, writing explanatory notes highlighting points of interest in the exegesis and translation process, and transforming the passage into an artistic product suitable for another linguistic and cultural environment.

AL5333 Tone Analysis (Fall - Even numbered years) (3 graduate credits)

A majority of the world’s unwritten languages are tonal, and this course will prepare those hoping to do language development work in these languages. The course includes extensive practice and coaching in hearing and transcribing tone, review of phonological theory that especially applies to tone, surveys of tonal phenomena by geographical area, and a multi-week project of tone analysis of a specific language that will cover beginning transcription, analysis, and a paper about the system.

AL5345-OL Introduction to Translator's Assistant (Upon demand) (3 graduate credits)

Discover a computer program designed to accelerate translation by producing initial drafts based on semantic representations. Students will apply their newly developed linguistic skills and produce initial translations in English and in another language of their choice.

AL5391 Thesis (Spring/Fall) (3 graduate credits)

By permission of graduate advisor; graded P/F; may be repeated.

AL5392 Special Projects in Applied Linguistics (Spring/Fall) (3 graduate credits)

May be repeated when topic changes, with permission of your graduate advisor.

AL5394 Readings in Applied Linguistics (TBA) (3 graduate credits)

This course introduces students to advanced analysis and description of a specific grammatical or phonological phenomenon, or a particular language or linguistic family, or a certain areal or typological feature. Under the supervision of a particular faculty member, the student works with the faculty member to design a focused set of readings in order to acquire a deeper understanding of a mutually-agreed upon topic of interest. Mastery of the material is demonstrated by reports, projects, papers, and/or oral discussion of the content with the instructor.

AL5395 Current Issues in Descriptive Linguistics (Fall) (3 graduate credits)

This course serves as a cap-stone seminar for students in the Descriptive Linguistics concentration, providing an opportunity to integrate knowledge from preceding courses through intensive study of some issue of current interest for linguistic analysis and description. The course aims to develop basic skills of linguistic scholarship through reading and critically discussing a variety of articles on the selected topic(s), and through writing and presenting a paper related to the issues discussed in the seminar.

Grammar topic in even numbered years and phonology topic in odd numbered years.

AL5396 Conference Course in Applied Linguistics (TBA) (3 graduate credits)

With permission of graduate advisor. May be repeated when topic changes.

AL5398 Seminar in Applied Linguistics (TBA) (3 graduate credits)

May be repeated when topic changes, with permission of graduate advisor.

AL5406 Field Methods and Linguistic Analysis (Spring/Fall) (4 graduate credits)

This course serves as the capstone course for the Certificate in Applied Linguistics. Working with a speaker of a non-western language, students in this course elicit data which they then use to produce a mini-lexicon, a phonological description, and a grammar sketch of the target language.