Intensive Courses in World Arts


WA3380-IN Introduction to Ethnodoxology (Intensive) (Spring) (3 Undergraduate credits)

This is a foundational course introducing key principles of ethnodoxology that will help students serve worshipping communities more effectively, whether overseas or in multi-ethnic North American contexts. Students will experience a corpus of songs and other artistic liturgical expressions from around the world, developing a vision for multicultural worship. In addition, students will explore appropriate ways to incorporate these artistic expressions into the worship life of their communities.

This course is also available at the graduate level by registering for WA5380.

Registration for a workshop version (no credit) is available in partnership with the International Council of Ethnodoxologists (ICE) – see here.

WA3381-IN Arts for a Better Future (Intensive) (Summer) (3 Undergraduate credits)

In this undergrad course, students will learn to help a community recognize, value, and plan to use its own arts to meet local needs and goals. The course provides a compact overview of the Create Local Arts Together (CLAT) model of community engagement. The CLAT process consists of seven flexible steps grounded in ethnographic and appreciative inquiry approaches: meet a community and its arts; specify goals; select communication genre and content; analyze the genre; spark creativity; improve new works and creative systems; integrate and celebrate for continuity. Students will engage with the model through three pedagogical cycles. This course is also available at the graduate level by registering for WA5381.

See a short video here.

You may also view the Arts for a Better Future FAQ or register for the one-week workshop version (no credit).

WA5380-IN Theory and Practice of Ethnodoxology (Intensive) (Spring) (3 Graduate credits)

This course explores the biblical, historical, and cultural principles of ethnodoxology for cross-cultural workers, community leaders, and worship facilitators, helping them to serve worshipping communities more effectively, whether overseas or in multi-ethnic North American contexts. Students are prepared to design the introduction of new artistic expressions into their own worshipping communities, undergirded by the use of relevant research methodologies and multicultural worship approaches.

This course is also available at the undergraduate level by registering for WA3380.

Registration for a workshop version (no credit) is available in partnership with the International Council of Ethnodoxologists (ICE) – see here.

WA5381-IN Arts for a Better Future (Intensive) (Summer) (3 Graduate credits)

In this grad-level course, students will learn to help a community recognize, value, and plan to use its own arts to meet local needs and goals. The course provides a compact overview of the Create Local Arts Together (CLAT) model of community engagement. The CLAT process consists of seven flexible steps grounded in ethnographic and appreciative inquiry approaches: meet a community and its arts; specify goals; select communication genre and content; analyze the genre; spark creativity; improve new works and creative systems; integrate and celebrate for continuity. Students will engage with the model through three pedagogical cycles, culminating in applying it to a real-life context. This course is also available at the undergraduate level by registering for WA3381.

See a short video here.

You may also view the Arts for a Better Future FAQ or register for the one-week workshop version (no credit).

WA5383-IN Arts and Trauma Healing (Intensive) (Spring) (3 Graduate credits)

This course teaches a holistic, interactive approach to engaging Scripture in the healing process for people who suffer from the mental, emotional, and spiritual effects of trauma. It combines biblical truths with basic mental health principles expressed in ways that can be easily translated into other languages. Students learn to address both cognitive beliefs and emotions damaged by trauma, both in their own lives and in the lives of others. They learn to use participatory learning methods to train local church leaders in ways that help them to become effective care-givers. In particular, this course will emphasize the importance of performing and visual arts in trauma healing. Students will understand and be able to articulate and demonstrate the role, the value, and the effectiveness of using the arts in trauma healing from a historical and contemporary perspective. Students will be able to promote emotional and spiritual healing in traumatized communities through the use of local visual and performing arts existing in those communities.

Crafted as a “blended” course, with readings and assignments completed online during Sessions 1-2, the course also requires a two-week period of on-campus participatory afternoon classes.

An alternative residential venue for this GIAL course is now available at All Nations in the UK. Both the Dallas and UK venues start in Spring Session 1 with an online portion featuring preparatory reading and writing before the residential portion. Registration for both venues of the course is through GIAL. For details, see the Arts and Trauma Healing FAQ.

This course is offered in collaboration with ABS’s Trauma Healing Institute (THI) and the Trauma Healing Alliance. In addition to earning GIAL course credit, students who demonstrate readiness during the course will be certified by THI as “Apprentice Facilitators” in trauma healing.

Intensive FAQs

What is the course about?

In this course, students will learn to help a community recognize, value, and plan to use its own arts to meet local needs and goals. The course provides a compact overview of the Create Local Arts Together (CLAT) model of community engagement. The CLAT process consists of seven flexible steps grounded in ethnographic and appreciative inquiry approaches: meet a community and its arts; specify goals; select communication genre and content; analyze the genre; spark creativity; improve new works and creative systems; integrate and celebrate for continuity. Students will engage with the model through three pedagogical cycles, culminating in applying it to a real-life context.

What will the course prepare me to do?

This course prepares students to be able to:

  • Describe and analyze the purposes and interrelationships of the seven Create Local Arts Together (CLAT) steps
  • Consult with a community representative as he or she plans to draw on their artistic resources in working toward a better future
  • Document and analyze some of the artistic resources of a community, including their plans to engage those arts for a better future

Is the course only offered as an online graduate course at Dallas International?

Participants have 3 options when taking Arts for a Better Future. It’s offered as:

  • A one-week intensive workshop – a one-week (on campus face-to-face) course
  • An undergraduate course (WA 3381) – for Dallas International undergraduate course credit. The course includes the one-week intensive along with additional pre-class reading and writing as well as a post-class project and write-up (all submitted online).
  • A graduate course (AA 5381)– for Dallas International graduate course credit. Like the undergraduate course, this version also includes the one-week intensive along with additional pre-class reading and writing. Students complete a post-class project and write-up, submitting all pre and post-class work online.

Besides the extra assignments, are there any significant differences in the “Workshop” versus the “For Credit” version of the course?

Participants in the one-week intensive workshop receive the same training as Dallas International undergraduate and graduate students. At the end of the workshop, all are equipped to help communities draw on their artistic resources to respond to spiritual, social, and physical needs.

With the required post-class project, graduate students immediately apply their new skills in the context of their local communities and write up a description of the experience for their final project. Undergraduate students will write about how they plan to use their newly acquired skills with a community they know.

How are the 3 options (workshop, undergrad, and grad credit) different from one another?

How do I register for the course?

ABF Workshophttp://artsforabetterfuture.org

For Undergraduate or Graduate Credithttps://www.diu.edu/admissions/applications. Choose the easy “Gateway” application for those not wanting to take further coursework at Dallas International.

When is the deadline for applying and having all my application materials for Arts for a Better Future?

All application materials (including transcripts, etc.) must be at Dallas International for processing by May 1, 2015. Apply now to make sure! If you only intend to take 1-3 courses at Dallas International, you can apply through the “Gateway Admission” which is faster.

How much does the course cost?

For the ABF Workshop:

$130 per person covers

  • registration and materials for the event
  • no housing/meals
  • code “NHM” needed at registration

$225 per person covers

  • registration and materials for the event
  • no housing/all meals provided
  • code “NH” needed at registration

$350 per person covers

  • a shared room Sunday-Friday nights at the Guest House
  • all meals
  • materials for the course
  • registration for the event
  • no “code” needed

For undergraduate and graduate credit hours:

The link to tuition and fees is here: https://www.diu.edu/tuition-fees/. You may pay for housing and/or food through the workshop course website at http://artsforabetterfuture.org.

What housing is available for the on-campus part of the course?

Additional information on housing may be found here: http://www.artsforabetterfuture.org/room–board.html

Are there scholarships available?

There are scholarships that you may apply for if you are a full-time Dallas International student, but not if this is your only course at Dallas International.

When does the online course work start?

The course runs during the summer session (late May through mid-August), so the “online” course work (reading and written responses – no classes) will start in May. But we will mail out the syllabus to all who are registered in early May so you can start reading early if you wish. After the residential part of the course, you will submit your final project online (August).

Does the online component include recorded lectures?

No. The course is not really “online” as all teacher input is face-to-face during the week long intensive. There are no recorded lectures or videos posted online. It’s only “online” in that the assignments are submitted online.

When should I arrive and depart?

It is very important to plan your travel so that you can be there for Sunday evening intros of the residential period and all of the class sessions Monday through Friday at 5:00 PM.

What is the residential part of the course like?

  • We begin with a dinner and “get to know you” session on Sunday evening.
  • Class runs each morning from 9 – 12 and each afternoon from 2 – 5.

ABF takes students through three cycles of the CLAT process. CLAT consists of 7 steps that guide an arts advocate in their work helping a community draw on their arts to reach their physical, spiritual, and social goals. It’s basically a participatory method of engagement:

Phase One: Brian Schrag tells/shows/performs the story of his engagement with the Mono community in NW Democratic Republic of Congo. Phase One gives participants a mental framework of the CLAT process.

Phase Two: Instructors Brian Schrag and Robin Harris work through a more detailed demonstration of each of the 7 CLAT steps, using Robin’s experiences, data, and relationships from a group in northern Siberia. This phase includes helping students work with a representative of the Siberian group. Participants learn basic elements of a song/dance form foreign to them, and then compose within it. Phase Two results in paradigm shifts in most participants, viscerally understanding the importance and methods of encouraging people to create using locally-grounded art forms.

Phase Three: We divide the participants into smaller groups planning to apply the CLAT process to communities they know. Phase Three allows them to make initial plans to integrate local arts into extensions of the Kingdom of Heaven in contexts they care about.

What textbooks are used?

Schrag, Brian. 2013. Creating Local Arts Together: A Manual to Help Communities Reach their Kingdom Goals. Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library.

[Purchase at http://ethnodoxologyhandbook.com/manual or at Dallas International’s Center for Excellence in World Arts—https://www.diu.edu/cewa—if you are in Dallas.]

What percent of the focus is on performing arts vs. visual arts?

We attempt to cover all artistic domains equally in this course (visual arts, music, drama, dance, and oral verbal arts like poetry and storytelling) so that students are prepared to facilitate all kinds of artistic expressions, according to the needs of the community.

What background material could I read to prepare for the course?

No background material is required other than Creating Local Arts Together: A Manual to Help Communities Reach their Kingdom Goals (CLAT Manual). Non-credit students are not required to read the CLAT Manual; however, we highly recommend that they do, if at all possible, and that they take notes while reading.

Who teaches the course?

Brian Schrag, PhD, serves as head of SIL International’s Ethnomusicology and Arts Group. He worked as an arts consultant in Central Africa and founded the World Arts program at the Dallas International University (Dallas International). Brian loves to make people laugh, sing, and imagine heaven.

Robin Harris, PhD, has M.A.s in Intercultural Studies and Ethnomusicology and a Ph.D. in Music (Ethnomusicology). She lived for a decade in northern Russia as well as a number of years in Alaska and Canada. She is the Director of the Center for Excellence in World Arts at Dallas International, the President of the International Council of Ethnodoxologists (ICE), and serves as an Arts Consultant with SIL International

Who teaches the course?

Mary Beth Saurman has a BS in Music Therapy and an MA in Intercultural Studies/Ethnomusicology.  Mary is a PhD Candidate at University of Bern in Bern, Switzerland with a focus of ethnomusicology and arts combined in multilingual education. Mary Beth has 13 years experience working as a Creative Arts Therapist and Music Therapist in clinical settings, including: mental health care, geriatric care, and special needs.  Her training and expertise focus on Music Therapy and Dance/Movement Therapy. In addition she has worked in the other areas of Creative Arts as therapy. Mary Beth has applied these skills sets and her further training in Ethnomusicology in Asia with SIL International for the last 22 years as an advocate for the music and arts of ethnic minority groups. In Thailand, she works as an Ethnomusicologist for Mahidol University in Bangkok.  Mary Beth also teaches at Payap University in Chieng Mai, training nationals from Asia and Eurasia as catalysts for the creation of culturally relevant arts.  She work in the areas of using Arts in Trauma Healing, Community Development, Scripture Engagement, Sustainability, Literacy, Multilingual Education, Media, Bible Storying, and more.

For almost thirty years, Wendy Atkins ministered in central Africa with Africa Inland Mission. Witnessing untold trauma among the region’s displaced peoples, Wendy began coordinating trauma healing workshops to aid in their recovery. Wendy’s extensive experience led Dr. Robin Harris to request that she work with Dr. Harriet Hill of the American Bible Society’s Trauma Healing Institute to develop and teach the initial Arts and Trauma Healing course offered by Dallas International’s Center for Excellence in World Arts (CEWA) in 2014.

Wendy holds a Bachelor’s degree in Music Education from Houghton College, a Graduate Certificate in Biblical Studies from Columbia International University, and certification as an Arts Training Specialist from the International Council of Ethnodoxologists. She completed her MA in World Arts at CEWA in 2017 and now serves as the school’s Arts and Trauma Healing Liaison, teaches undergraduate courses, and assists with the graduate program. She is a Master Facilitator in the Classic Trauma Healing program.

What is the course about?

This course teaches a holistic, interactive approach to engaging Scripture and local arts in the healing process for people who suffer from the mental, emotional, and spiritual effects of trauma. It combines biblical truths with basic mental health principles expressed in ways applicable to many contexts. Students learn to address the effects of damaged beliefs and emotions resulting from trauma in their own lives and in the lives of others. Through expressive arts exercises and participatory learning methods, students personally process the material and develop facilitation skills based on arts and trauma healing theory and practice. Students will understand and be able to articulate and demonstrate the role, the value, and the effectiveness, and the practice of using contextualized expressive arts in trauma healing.

This course is offered in collaboration with American Bible Society’s Trauma Healing Institute (THI) and the Trauma Healing Alliance. In addition to earning Dallas International course credit, students who demonstrate readiness during the course will be certified by THI as “Apprentice Facilitators” in trauma healing.

What will the course prepare me to do?

This course prepares students to be able to:

  • Apply knowledge of the scope of trauma in the world and its impact on individuals and communities to their own personal and/or work experience.
  • Create basic, culturally appropriate approaches for trauma healing.
  • Create appropriate materials and facilitation approaches for basic trauma care in a healing group.
  • Create relevant research designs and contextualized trauma healing approached for empowering communities in discovering effective uses of their own art forms in the trauma healing process.

When is the deadline for applying and having all my application materials for Arts in Trauma Healing?

All application materials (including transcripts, etc.) must be at Dallas International for processing by December 1. Apply now to make sure! If you only intend to take 1-3 courses at Dallas International, you can apply through the “Gateway Admission” which is faster.

What does a 3-credit grad course like this cost?

The link to tuition and fees is here: https://www.diu.edu/admissions/tuition-and-fees-graduate

If you will be paying your tuition and fees with non-US currency, please contact the Dallas International Business Manager at paul_setter@diu.edu for payment instructions.

Are there scholarships available?

There are scholarships that you may apply for if you are a full-time Dallas International student, but not if this is your only course at Dallas International.

When does the online course work start?

Both for the Dallas and UK venues, the online course work (readings and written responses) begins on January 7, 2019. Copies of the syllabus with details concerning the readings will be available by mid-December 2018.

The final online assignments for the Dallas course are due March 5, 2019. Ending dates for assignments for the UK course will be posted here soon but will be sometime towards the end of April.

What is the residential part of the course like?

  • We begin with an introductory session on the Sunday before classes begin.
    • Sunday afternoon, February 10th for the Dallas course
    • Sunday evening, March 24th for the UK course
  • Then Monday through Friday for the next two weeks (February 11 – 22 in Dallas; March 25 – April 4 in the UK) classes are held for 3 to 4 hours each day. Several evening sessions are required as well. Students should plan on spending 3-4 hours each day to complete daily assignments. The residential part of the course is truly an intensive time of learning and study!

When should I arrive and depart?

  • It is very important to plan your travel so that you arrive for the Sunday introductory session (by 2PM in Dallas; between 4PM and 6PM in the UK).
  • Your departure should be scheduled as late as possible the last day of the residential classes. Detailed class schedules will be available along with the syllabus in mid-December for those students who have registered.

What housing is available for the on-campus part of the course?

Dallas: Prices and other information about housing on our Dallas International campus can be found here: https://www.diu.edu/student-life/housing and to reserve housing you can write to housing_dallas@sil.org. You are expected to arrange for your own housing.

UK: Please see the next question concerning arrangements for taking the course in the UK.

What do I need to know about registration, housing, and lodging if I am taking the course in the UK?

For those taking the course at All Nations in the UK, use your registration number provided by Dallas International University to complete your registration. Go to this link then click on the blue button on the top of that page for “Residential Application” to enable you to fill in the form and make your payment online. If you do not need lodging or food, please register anyway then contact Katharine Shaw at k.shaw@allnations.ac.uk, letting her know that you will not be staying or eating meals at All Nations.

Approximate hours of work per week?

Unless you are a fast worker, graduate level courses generally require approximately 2-3 times the amount of homework in relation to instructional time (which is 40 hours), so approximately 150 hours (plus or minus 20 hrs) spread over two months. This is only an average amount of work… some students work more slowly or more quickly.

What textbooks are used?

Final list of textbooks will go out to registrants in December, but here is the tentative list:

Advance purchase (for use in reading during January)

  • Herman, Judith. 1992. Trauma and Recovery: the aftermath of violence—from domestic abuse to political terror. NY, NY: Harper. ISBN 0-465-08730-2. [For vendors, see here]
  • Hill, Harriet, Margaret Hill, Richard Bagge, Pat Miersma. 2013. Healing the Wounds of Trauma: How the Church Can Help. American Bible Society, NY, NY. [For vendors, see here]
  • Langberg, Diane. 2015. Suffering and the Heart of God: How Trauma Destroys and Christ Restores. Greensboro, NC: New Growth Press. [For vendors, see here]
  • Malchiodi, Cathy A. 2005. Expressive Therapies. New York: Guilford Press. [For vendors, see here]
  • Mollica, Richard F. 2008. Healing Invisible Wounds: Paths to Hope and Recovery in a Violent World. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Publishers. [For vendors, see here]
  • Nichols, Michael P. 2011 [2nd edition]. The Lost Art of Listening. New York: Guilford Press. [For vendors, see here]
  • Schrag, Brian. 2013. Creating Local Arts Together: A Manual to Help Communities Reach their Kingdom Goals. Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library. [Purchase here]
  • Yoder, Carolyn. 2005. The Little Book of Trauma Healing: When Violence Strikes and Community Security is Threatened. Intercourse, Pennsylvania: Good Books. [For vendors, see here]

What percent of the focus is on performing arts vs. visual arts?

We attempt to cover all artistic domains equally in this course (visual arts, music, drama, dance, and oral verbal arts like poetry and storytelling) so that students are prepared to facilitate all kinds of artistic expressions, according to the needs of the traumatized person or community.

What background material could I read to prepare for the course?

You should begin the course reading as soon as you’re able (and have the syllabus). Background material on the Trauma Healing Institute (THI) site http://thi.americanbible.org would provide some information as well. Dr. Harriet Hill, who directs THI, helped to develop this course. You can also look at the film trailer for a new documentary done on THI: www.americanbible.org/hope-rising